Arabic Alphabet starts with a chart of various Arabic letters. Students can click on each letter to see how it is written, and there are images of letters written in different positions, based on the surrounding context of written information. Also available are audio and video clips for letters that are written similarly, letters that are pronounced similarly and vowels.
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Importance Of Reading the Quran with Tajweed Many of us, when we first begin learning to recite the Quran with Tajweed and Makharij, we feel intimidated by the number of things we need to know and apply, to be able to recite the Quran melodiously and accurately. We feel overwhelmed by the large number ofRead more about Importance Of Reading the Quran with Tajweed[…]

It’s easy to fall into the trap of trying to learn Arabic by transcribing words instead of learning the alphabet first. Think about how we learned English back in school. First, you learn your letters, then you form those letters into words, then you learn how to form sentences, and then you learn more about proper syntax and grammar. Taking shortcuts will only slow you down.
Even if your learning goals aren’t focused on being able to discuss politics, you can still get a lot of useful vocabulary out of reading the news. When I told my tutor I’d had a hard week because of the كارثة (disaster) at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, I was glad to be able to use a strong word to express the weight of the situation. I remember learning that word from reading a sleepy article on global warming, but I was able to use it in a context of my choosing.
How? By making use of most of your senses during the learning process: you start by visually matching words with pictures, you hear how the words are pronounced by natives, you see how phrases are written and you speak Arabic. Moreover, you get instant feedback every step of the way until you get it right. Following this approach, you will be ready for real life Arabic conversations in no time.
Modern Standard Arabic. Unless your interest is confined to one particular country, the safest option is to learn a version of the classical language known as Modern Standard Arabic. MSA is used across the Arab World, but is generally confined to writing and formal contexts: literature, newspapers, education, radio/television news programs, political speeches, etc.
Learn the Arabic alphabet. The Arabic script seems daunting at first, and some people try to avoid learning it by relying on transliterations of Arabic words. This merely stores up problems for later; it is much better to ignore transliterations and use the script from the start. The best you can do is to buy or borrow a book at the library, since this is a long and difficult project.
The Qur'an ("Qor-Ann") is a Message from Allah (swt) to humanity. It was transmitted to us in a chain starting from the Almighty Himself (swt) to the angel Gabriel to the Prophet Muhammad (saw). This message was given to the Prophet (saw) in pieces over a period spanning approximately 23 years (610 CE to 632 CE). The Prophet (saw) was 40 years old when the Qur'an began to be revealed to him, and he was 63 when the revelation was completed. The language of the original message was Arabic, but it has been translated into many other languages.
If you want to learn Quran with a live Quran tutor, you can do so also by signing up with an online Quran academy. These academies offer online Quran classes through Skype or other audio/video communication software. Some of them have qualified and knowledgeable male & female Islamic scholars. These online classes have proved to be very effective and convenient.
Modern Standard Arabic has developed out of Classical Arabic, the language of the Quran. During the era of the caliphate,Classical Arabic was the language used for all religious, cultural, administrative and scholarly purposes. Modern Standard Arabic is the official Arabic language. It can be written and spoken, and there is no difference between the written and the spoken form. In its written form, Modern Standard Arabic is the language of literature and the media. Books, newspapers, magazines, official documents, private and business correspondence, street signs and shop signs - all are written in Modern Standard Arabic. Arabic is a name applied to the descendants of the Classical Arabic language of the 6th century AD. This includes both the literary language and varieties of Arabic spoken in a wide arc of territory stretching across the Middle East and North Africa. Some of the spoken varieties are mutually unintelligible, both written and orally, and the varieties as a whole constitute a sociolinguistic language. This means that on purely linguistic grounds they would likely be considered to constitute more than one language, but are commonly grouped together as a single language for political and/or ethnic reasons (see below). If considered multiple languages, it is unclear how many languages there would be, as the spoken varieties form a dialect chain with no clear boundaries. If Arabic is considered a single language, it perhaps is spoken by as many as 280 million first language speakers, making it one of the half dozen most populous languages in the world. If considered separate languages, the most-spoken variety would most likely be Egyptian Arabic, with 54 million native speakers still greater than any other Semitic language.
The Hifz (Memorization) and its retention and safeguarding in the chests is one of the prominent Sunnahs found in the lives of The Sahaaba and our Righteous Predecessors. This preservation and passing on of the recitation was done in the strictest of manners without letting any deviations or differences to creep in. The Rules of Recitation, i.e. Tajweed is a result of these efforts.
We would try our best to teach a bit more than just recitation of the Quran, so that your kids be a very good Muslims of the society as well. And also adults and sister can learn meaning of the verses with the teacher also known as the translation of the Holy Quran online and Tafsir of the Holy Quran as well.  With Urdu, English and Arabic speaking Quran teachers you and your kids can learn the Holy Quran with meaning as well. You can request for this course to the administration once you complete your Quran reading with Tajweed course online. We will provide you the best Quran teacher for the purpose of Tafsir and translation. Hence, LearnQuran.Online is the best online Quran institute and Academy which offers Quran lessons for kids and adults where adults and kids can learn Tajweed lessons and also can learn Quran reading fluently.

FluentU has fully captioned authentic Arabic videos, with correct translations at the sentence level instead of just the definitions for individual words. Every video is made approachable to every learner with interactive captions—just hover your cursor over (or tap) anything you don’t understand in the captions, and you’ll bring up an on-screen definition complete with authentic pronunciation, an image, in context usage and examples from other fun videos in the program.


Thank you for putting this post together and for all the great advices on your webpage. You’ve got me convinced that I can and should start learning the alphabet(!), that I should stick to the Levantine dialect, go all in on find good material/webpages, teachers (or perhaps create a study group with some fellow students!) And – most important – that my constant thoughts about culture and language assimilation are worth continue to explore within linguistics, cultural and social anthropology 🙂
But you know one thing I’ve learned during all my travels through the Middle East and everywhere else in the world is that most people regardless of their political or religious affiliations, just care about the same stuff you and I care about: getting married, having kids, going to work to put food on the table, buying a new home, the latest gadgets, a new pair of shoes, etc.
Your article is spot on! I'm the son of an Arabic native speaker, but grew up in an English-speaking house. As a result, I grew up HEARING Palestinian Arabic and READING Qur'anic Arabic. Total disconnect. I went to college and took three semesters of Modern Standard Arabic. More disconnect! I did not move forward in TWENTY years toward fluency because I had low proficiency in THREE Arabics! I finally moved over to Palestinian Arabic to learn that there are THREE Palestinian Arabics: Mádani (urban, esp. in Jaffa and Jerusalem), Fellá7 (rural), and Bádawi (nomadic). All three are mutually intelligible, but one is pigeon-holed by other Palestinians depending on which Palestinian Arabic said person uses! I stuck with Mádani Palestinian Arabic and my proficiency skyrocketed. A couple of my own suggestions beyond your article: (1) get Arabic writing capability on your computer so you get away from transliteration sooner than later, (2) learn how to write in Arabic by writing English words using Arabic letters (by reading back English words with Arabic phonics rules, you'll develop an Arabic accent much faster that way), (3) think in triliteral roots (same as in Hebrew) and you'll remember words better, (4) learn early on how to use an Arabic dictionary by using the triliteral roots, (5) learn proverbs — that always impresses Arabs! I am most amused that that the Palestinian Israeli singer Mira Awad is teaching her fellow Israeli singer Noa Palestinian Arabic though Noa is the daughter of Yemeni Jews. DRAMATICALLY different Arabics!! 🙂

Learning to recite the verses of the Quran isn’t just about fulfilling your Islamic duties; it’s about letting Allah into your heart so that his sacred teachings can provide guidance for the rest of your life, and the rewards of understanding the Quran’s teachings are plentiful. Whether you’re looking for Quran lessons for kids or want to enhance your own understanding, contact us today or at the numbers given below.
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