I can’t be any happier with this program. Without the need to leave the house, I have access to highly qualified teachers through advanced video conferencing and with a very flexible schedule. However, what I love most about the program is the friendliness of the teachers and the special bond they develop with their students. My daughter loves her teacher and put willingly more efforts in her lessons and homework. As for my son, he is starting High School and wouldn’t consider allocating time to go to another school; therefore, taking lessons from home according to his own schedule was the best solution. The program is managed very efficiently with a prompt response and fast schedule adjustments when needed.
There is no Jannah without sacrifices and sacrifice begins at one’s own level. The extra time that you waste watching TV, listening to Music, chatting with friends, roaming around aimlessly etc can be put to learning Qur’an. It not only benefits you in the Akhirah but also in the duniya. A person whose tongue recites Qur’an has more chances of his dua getting accepted. It also keeps a person away from sins related to the tongue.

Reading is a much better way to gather new vocabulary than encountering new words out of context. In the Finbo the Whale story, for example, I finally got a grasp on spelling حوت (whale), which was a word I’d heard before but struggled with. Which letter H? ح or ه? Which letter T? ت or ط? By reading it several times in context, the correct spelling now just “looks right.”
Unlike the layered verbiage you’ll contend with when you’re ready to read novelists like Naguib Mahfouz or Ahlam Mosteghanemi, you have a chance at understanding the meaning of Tamer’s sentences. For example, in “النمور في اليوم العاشر” (Tigers on the Tenth Day), the parallel sentence structures give you a chance to follow the progression of the story from day one to day ten as the tiger gives up the pieces of his freedom and dignity. Hey, I didn’t say they were happy stories.
Thanks so much for the great post. A quick question: I totally get what you're saying about learning a dialect first, and also about avoiding transliterated books, but sometimes that can be a bit of a hard thing to do. I checked out your post on Levantine Arabic (I am learning Palestinian myself) and the books you cited were for those already know MSA. Are there any books you could recommend that teach Palestinian or Lebanese dialects that are not all transliterated? Any pointers would be much appreciated.

Learn Quran Academy was established in 2006 with the aim of teaching the Holy Quran from Arabic alphabets to reading Quran with Tajweed in U.K and all over the word. Our key aim in mind is to prepare children who are unable to read Quran with Tafseer and Tajweed for adults also who can read but not aware of Tajweed rules. We are specialized in teaching Quran with Tajweed which is the true pronunciation of the Quran and the recommended way of reading Quran.
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